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Neuengamme Concentration Camp Memorial – Monuments for individual groups of victims

Sculpture 'The Despair' for the deportees from Meensel-Kiezegem, Belgium.
Memorial to the dead of the Warsaw Uprising at the Neuengamme Concentration Camp Memorial.
Memorial for the victims among Jehovah's Witnesses at the Neuengamme Concentration Camp Memorial.
Memorial stone for homosexual victims of National Socialism at the Neuengamme Concentration Camp Memorial.

Additional monuments and memorial stones for victims of the Neuengamme concentration camp are located in a memorial grove near the International Monument. They include symbolic gravestones placed by family members for individual victims as well as memorial complexes dedicated to specific groups of victims. Most of these monuments and memorials were erected on the initiative of the groups themselves.

Groups of victims
In May 1985, a memorial stone for the homosexual victims of National Socialism was dedicated on the initiative of the association known as the Independent Homosexual Alternative, with the support of the Hamburg Cultural Authority. It was the first memorial stone at a concentration camp memorial to commemorate homosexual victims of Nazi persecution. The memorial site was redesigned in 1996 and an information panel was added.

In 1988, a monument was erected for the 540 victims from the town of Putten in the Netherlands who were deported to Neuengamme following a reprisal raid by the Wehrmacht in October 1944.

A sculpture entitled ‘Die Verzweiflung’ (Desperation), which was created by May Claerhout (born 1939) and erected in 1998, is dedicated to the 53 victims from the Belgian village of Meensel-Kiezegem.

A monument created by Jan de Weryha-Wysoczanski (born 1950) in 1999 commemorates the several thousand people who were deported to Neuengamme after the Warsaw Uprising in 1944.

In April 2006, a monument was erected for the Jehovah’s Witnesses who were imprisoned in the camp.

In June 2012, the sculpture ‘Murat dans la Tourmente’ (Murat in Torment) was dedicated in the memorial grove. It was created by Christian Pichot-Duclos (the grandson of a deportee) using French basalt and commemorates the victims of a German reprisal operation in France in July 1944, when over 100 men from the town of Murat were deported to the Neuengamme concentration camp.

The memorial grove is freely accessible to the public at all times.

Monument
Neuengamme Concentration Camp Memorial – Monuments for individual groups of victims
Neuengamme
Jean-Dolidier-Weg 39

Contact

KZ-Gedenkstätte Neuengamme

Jean-Dolidier-Weg 75
21039 Hamburg
Phone: 040-428131500

Exhibitions:
Monday to Friday 9.30am to 4pm,
Saturday and Sunday 12pm to 5pm
(between April to October 12pm to 7pm).

The grounds are always accessible.

Guiding tours:
Booable at Museumsdienst Hamburg. Mail: info(a)museumsdienst-hamburg.de and Phone: 040-428 131 0

 

Categories:
Monument
Topics:
Groups of victims
Resistance